Astronomy
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'''Jansky''' (symbol '''Jy''') is a non-[[SI]] unit of spectral [[flux density]],<ref>http://science.jrank.org/pages/57879/jansky.html {{dead link|date=April 2013}}</ref> or [[spectral irradiance]], used especially in [[radio astronomy]]. It is equivalent to 10<sup>&minus;26</sup> [[watt]]s per [[square metre]] per [[hertz]].
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'''Jansky''' is the unit of [[radiation density]], or [[flux]], usually associated with ]]radio emission]]. It was named in honour of [[Karl Jansky]], the first [[radio astronomy|radio astronomer]].
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The Jansky or Jy has the units 10-26 Watts Metre-2 Hertz-1 or 10-26 W m-2 Hz-1
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Radio sources of milliJanksy or mJy are routinely detected by modern radio telescopes.
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Some common units are:
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nJy = 10-9 Jy
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μJy = 10-6 Jy
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mJy = 10-3 Jy
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kJy = 103 Jy
   
 
==References==
 
==References==
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* http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/cosmos/J/Jansky
<references/>
 
 
[[Category:Glossary]]
 
[[Category:Glossary]]

Revision as of 03:53, 10 January 2018

Jansky is the unit of radiation density, or flux, usually associated with ]]radio emission]]. It was named in honour of Karl Jansky, the first radio astronomer.

The Jansky or Jy has the units 10-26 Watts Metre-2 Hertz-1 or 10-26 W m-2 Hz-1

Radio sources of milliJanksy or mJy are routinely detected by modern radio telescopes.

Some common units are:

nJy = 10-9 Jy μJy = 10-6 Jy mJy = 10-3 Jy kJy = 103 Jy

References